Rabid Raccoons Roam Miami-Dade

The Perazzo Law Firm Serving Animal Attack Victims in Miami.

Miami: Rabid raccoons roam Miami-Dade striking fear among residents of the Kendall area. According to the Florida Department of Health, five rabid raccoons have been detected thus far. Miami-Dade County officials have implemented a two-month rabies alert and warn locals to avoid raccoons coming into contact with pets like dogs or cats as the rabies can spread to them if they are bitten or scratched. The authorities also recommend vaccinating all domestic animals against rabies and warn against approaching any wild animals they encounter. Pet owners should update rabies vaccinations and be cautious of where their pets roam, especially at night. The authorities also recommend taking measures as to not attract any wild animals. These measures include keeping garbage under wraps and making sure there is no food left outdoors that can attract wild animals. Children should also be instructed on safety measures to avoid contact with wild animals. Raccoons are nocturnal and omnivorous and can be found in forests, mountain ranges, coastal marshes, and urban areas. Anyone that has been either bitten or scratched by a raccoon, should seek immediate medical attention and report the incident to the Florida Department of Health in Miami-Dade County. 

The Perazzo Law Firm serves victims who have suffered personal injuries as a result of an animal attack. If you, a family member or loved one has suffered personal injury as a result of an animal attack, we urge you to contact us Online or call (786) LAWS-411 for a FREE initial consultation. 

THE PERAZZO LAW FIRM – DEDICATED TO PUTTING YOU INTERESTS FIRST

SE HABLA ESPAÑOL 

Dangerous Animal Facts:

Mosquitos kill approximately 725,000 humans every year, making them the most dangerous animal (insect) in world for humans. Mosquitos represent a deadly danger because of their tendency to spread fatal disease like Dengue, Malaria, Zika, and other bacteria related illnesses. Snakes rank 2nd followed by rabid dogs and crocodiles, which account for approximately 1000 deaths per year. There are over 1.2 million alligators in Florida, which represents a potential threat to the local population despite alligators not being human predators.